Infographics: what’s not to love!

I have been seeing infographics everywhere lately, and it’s easy to see why. They are visually appealing, easy to read, and easy to share.  A good infographic will present information in an interesting, colourful, and easy to digest format. Usually infographics focus on a specific subject like environmental issues, or trends in technology, but good ideas are only limited by our imagination!

There are many online tools that make it easy for students to create their own infographics, and infographics fit easily into every area of the curriculum.
  • Socials: display a timeline of events, environmental issue, current or historical stats:  growth trends, population, resources, etc
  • PE: explain energy & sports, how to master a skill, or compare participation in recreational activities by age group
  • Science: inventions/inventors, steps in a science experiment, global weather trends, pesticides on our planet, endangered animals
  • English/Art: outline the life of a famous author/artist (include data on their body of work), writing tips, Shakespeare said what/when
  • Psychology: examine a trend…, a change…, mental illness, learning styles, relationships, aging
  • Home Ec: nutrition stats & facts, super-foods, fast foods, diet trends
While creating their infographics, my library science students worked on many different skills like: making predictions, interpreting statistics and data, and exploring and improving their design skills.
Kathy Schrock has great resources, and I have attached a link to my assignment and a simple rubric. Below are just a few of the infographics made by my Library Science students. Now they are working on a video tutorial showing how to use Piktochart, which they decided was the easiest tool they tried.
Infographics are challenging and fun for the students. Plus, I had a lot of fun learning with them, but then I always do. Try making one and let me know what you think?
My Infographic
My Infographic-jhsslearningcommons

amy

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